Pixel Compare

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This tool takes two images and displays the differences between them. It uses very simple heuristics to determine whether two pixels are the same or not.

The tool is useful when you have two images that are very similar and you would like to cut out specific parts of it. For example, suppose you have a picture of a person in front of a background, and another copy of the picture without the person. You can easily erase the background by simply running a pixel compare and returning the difference.

Preview

tool_pixelCompare1

In the input panel on the left, the image on the top is the original image I have. My goal is to crop out the shapes. I have a version of the picture with only the background, so I use that as my target for comparison. Running the compare results in the image in the center, where the background has been removed and only the shapes remain.

Download

Pixel Compare

Requirements

.NET framework 2.0 or above

Usage

First, this tool requires both images to be the exact same size.

The easiest way to use this tool is to use the shortcuts that I have provided.

  • Drag and drop an image over an input panel to open it
  • Drag and drop two images onto the tool to set the source and target simultaneously
  • Press Ctrl+Z to compare the two images
  • Press Ctrl+X to swap the source with the target
  • Press Ctrl+C to copy the output as PNG with alpha channel preserve

The Use as source button will set whatever is displayed in the output panel as the source input.

The tolerance function allows you to adjust the compare threshold. A tolerance of zero means two pixels must be exactly the same (in RGBA value) for the tool to remove. Higher tolerance means that two pixels may be somewhat similar and still be removed.

The source images are never modified.

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1 Response

  1. William Black says:

    Broken link to download

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